ENVR107 – Lab 5 – Weather Analysis

Camosun College – Stefan Martensson

  1. A. Weather Observations at 10:00am – Feb 11 – Feb 18, 2010. More elaborate descriptions below.

Feb 11 – Cloudy, drizzles, some fog over the ocean, light wind, temp 8C.
Feb 12 – Cloudy, light wind, temp 8C.
Feb 13 – Cloudy, drizzles, light wind, temp 8C.
Feb 14 – Partly cloudy, slight wind, temp 8C.
Feb 15 – Partly cloudy, slight wind, temp 6C.
Feb 16 – Clear, sunny, no wind, temp 9C.
Feb 17 – Clear, sunny, no wind, temp 7C.
Feb 18 – Clear, sunny, no wind, temp 6C.

  1. B. Data Acquisition

Hourly data for Victoria International Airport was collected from Environment Canada Weather Office website (http://www.weatheroffice.gc.ca/) for Feb 11 – Feb 18. Total daily precipitation was added to each dataset. All data is presented in graphical format the end of this report.

  1. C. Data Presentation

Graphs were created to show hourly weather data for Victoria International Airport from Feb. 11 to Feb 18 (Figure 1 through 18). All figures are listed at the end of this report.

  1. D. Data Analysis

3. The pressure increased steadily from Feb 12th until the morning of Feb 17th. The temperature was fairly stable at around 7-10C the first two-thirds of the period, but as it cleared up, and pressure increased, on Feb 16th, higher fluctuations was witnessed in temperature ranging from just above freezing to almost 12C. Wind direction started out at SE the first two-thirds of the period. As pressure increased and the cloud cover decreased, the wind direction started to change to W-WNW for remainder of the period. The period was fairly dry with an average precipitation over the period of 1.1mm/day with the majority fallen on Feb 14th (4.2mm).

4. The data previously analysed are consistent with a maritime tropical high pressure system that moved from the SW, pushing its way in from California the 11th going north. By the 17th a stable high pressure cell had been created and settled over Vancouver Island. The progressive high can easiest be shown in Figure 18, but Figures 9 and 11 also indicate this daily raise in pressure.

Figure 16 indicates the classic relationship between Relative Humidity (%), RH,  and Temperature (oC), where temperature rise, RH decrease and vice versa.

5. Tropical high pressure systems are not uncommon in Canada during the winters, but the mean temperature for February is just below 5oC which makes this 8-day period warmer than normal. The period was also dryer than normal with 1.1mm/ day of precipitation and the average for February being 3.9mm/day.

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